SUMMARY IN ENGLISH

CONTRA # 1 1997



Human rights for Hells Angels and ravers!

Hells Angels members and ravers have human rights! Leftist media and police jointly attacks members of the Hells Angels (motorcycle clubs) and ravers. A Swedish commissioned officer was fired with the only objection that he was a member of a local Hells Angels prospect club in Stockholm. He was regarded as an excellent officer and was fired with the only explanation given that he was a member of an organization linked to criminals. He has never been indicted nor prosecuted for any crime and the army had no proof whatsoever that he had any links with criminals. In spite of this he was fired. The Union of Swedish Officers took on his case and he won a complete victory at the Labour Court. In spite of the loss in the Court the Army refused to reemploy the officer. The Swedish Commander in Chief (through the chief information officer, colonel Owe Wagermark), responds to Contra's questions.

Police also has emptied the dancing house of ravers at the "Docklands Club" at a seaside suburb of Stockholm. Youngsters were forced to leave the house and stay outside without their outdoor clothes at minus 10 degrees centigrade temperatures for several hours. The police arrested between five and ten people for violating drug laws - in an audience of some 1 000 people. The police never dared to raid popular clubs in downtown Stockholm, because if they did, they would get a much higher percentage of drug law offenders, and at the same time the would have much more unfavorable publicity for causing pneumonia of stars in media and acting, as well as leading journalists and politicians.

Communist they are!
Communists they are, in spite of a new party program of the "Leftist Party", formerly the Communist Party, of Sweden. In spite of the party's very succesful campaign to "wash away" the stigma of communism, they still advocate very much marxist and communist ideas, although these ideas are "packaged" in decent wordings. But still you find thoughts on "power struggle", the crushing of capitalism, "solidaric resistance", fight against the "patriarchate", class struggle and so on.



He doesn't like the Swedish National Anthem - and he is paid for it!
A private bill in parliament sponsored by Greek born Communist parliamentarian Alexander Chrisopoulos suggested a new text for the Swedish national anthem. The present text includes references to "chauvinism from the times when Sweden tried to be a great power". The author of the article in Contra, a former chief county prosecutor, makes an unfavorable comparison to the Greek national anthem. Mr Chrisopoulos receives, after nine years in the Swedish parliament, a monthly allowance of 18 150 kronor (2 500 dollars) until his death.

The European Monetary Union
The time is in for a decision on the EMU (European Monetary Union). Former member of the Swedish Parliament, Björn von der Esch, gives his negative views on a Swedish membership in the Union. Mr von der Esch, with a PhD in Economics, and a large-scale farmer, used to be the Conservative MP of the county of Södermanland, but was expelled from the party because of his non-party line views on the European Union and the EMU.

Gays are not that many
Gays are not one in ten but one in sixty. A popular gay slogan claims that one in ten is gay, but this is based on false interpretations of the Kinesy report. The true figure seems to be more like one in sixty.

Herbert Tingsten - one of the heroes of the Cold War
The only Swede to be represented in the series "heroes of the cold war" is Herbert Tingsten. Professor in political science and managing editor of Sweden's largest selling daily newspaper at the time, Dagens Nyheter. Mr Tingsten was an eloquent advocate of Swedish membership in NATO and a Swedish independent nuclear bomb.

Cyprus
Contra correspondent Bertil Wedin on the situation in Cyprus.

The future of Latvia
An interview with Valentins Silamikelis on the political development in Latvia. Mr Silamikelis was expelled from Sweden, together with other refugees, in 1946 and later served five years in the Soviet Arctic.






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